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Shawn Colvin


Country of origin:

U.S.

Type of music generally:

Contemporary folk; later releases have more pop influences

Status:

Most recent release, Colvin and Earle (with Steve Earle, 2016); most recent release of solo material, Uncovered (2015); most recent release of original solo material, All Fall Down (2012)

See also:

The Official Shawn Colvin site

Comparisons:

In my opinion, Shawn is at the heart of the new folk revolution; Nanci Griffith, Patty Larkin, The Story, John Gorka, Dave Wilcox, even Richard Thompson are some rough comparisons. (mjmjminla@yahoo.com)

Covers/own material:

Own and co-written; has done a disc of cover songs

General comments:

Straight from the liner notes of Cover Girl Shawn Colvin writes: "Before I worked up the courage to write them, I learned songs by all the songwriters I admired (I still do)." Guess what? Me too. As I said earlier, the release of Steady On in 1989, coupled with a few things going on in my life in 1990, prompted me to pick up the guitar for the first time. I telephoned my writing partner and guitarist, Bill Mazur, and he suggested that I learn from those artists that I liked the most—ones that were easy to sing to and had basic chord structures. Loving The Beatles as much as I have all my life, I ran down to the local music store, rented a guitar, bought a chord book, and purchased three "best of" Beatles books. Played 'till my fingers bled. And here I am, 9 years later, loving Shawn Colvin more than ever, writing music with Bill (Honestly! I would have picked up her music book too, but Shawn was WAY too advanced for me to learn!) I'm not certain about how long Shawn Colvin's been playing the guitar. I can tell you, she sounds like she was born with one in her hands! :o) Bravo! For the life of me I can't figure out why it took them so long to give her a Grammy. Shawn kept playing, singing, and writing...THANK YOU SHAWN!!! I know, without strong musicians like Shawn Colvin and John Leventhal, there wouldn't be musicians like Bill and I. With much of her moodiness, and love for song, I can tell you there's a little of her in all we write. Shawn is deeply affecting, and touching. I truly admire the fearless way she wears her heart out on her sleeve. For years I was content to write about anything except my feelings. Then came Shawn Colvin. She has integrity and grace, on and off the stage. If you're listening to Shawn Colvin in your car, at home, in the shower, or your studio...I can just about guarantee, you will be forced to feel every emotion! To me that's a good thing. (Scary!...But Good!)
     Forever and Always Singing. (kmichaels@kmichaels.com, see also Katheleen Michaels' Guide entry)

Shawn Colvin did a live solo version of Talking Heads' "Naive Melody (This Must Be the Place)" that knocked me out a few years ago, and it's also on her Cover Girl album. Great performance.
     She impressed me quite a bit as a guitarist when we used to see her play solo in between Grammys. :-) (Greg Dunn)

My introduction to her music was via an old customer of mine—he'd sent me a care package of sorts, along with this wonderful tape of John Gorka, Dave Wilcox, Shawn Colvin, etc. performing live, before they got "big" as it were.
     Shawn's simple vocal and guitar versions of "I Don't Know Why" and "Avalanche" really spoke volumes to me—I played that tape over and over. (kammerzj@peak.org)

The first time I heard Shawn was on the Theodore Sampler which has a live version of "Shotgun". Fantastic! I would recommend everyone to get a hold of this disk just for this song. Before she signed onto her major label, Shawn apparently had a cassette out with similar acoustic stuff. This was unfortunately withdrawn from the market when Steady On came out. There is other live/acoustic material out there that I would mortgage my left toe to get a hold of. Anyways, try to see her live, without band if possible, but even with band. (mjmjminla@yahoo.com)

Comments about live performance:

A powerful live performer, whether accompanied by a band or solo acoustic. (Greg Dunn)

I have seen Shawn 3 different times now. Once when she opened (and played with) Richard Thompson, once alone just with her guitar, and once with a band. Here I describe the 2nd of these shows: probably about the best solo acoustic show I have ever witnessed. I will keep this short, but up front I would like to encourage you all to check out Shawn Colvin.
     Any other performer might have been hopelessly overshadowed by Vance Gilbert, such an outstandingly strong opening act. In fact, I had only seen Colvin once before, opening for Richard Thompson, and she was somewhat lost in the crowd there. Last night this was not to be.
     I can say with glowing confidence that *every* *single* song Shawn played beat the album version hands down. No contest. You have not experienced this artist until you have seen her live, close-up. Everything they say about her is true. She produces a complete, polished sound, using the guitar as 4 different instruments, base, rhythm, lead, and beat. It is a wonder to behold the veins in her strumming arm pulsating with every wrist flick. And her songwriting is a perfect match for her talent. She played all the "hits" from the first album (incl. "shotgun", "diamond", "steady on") plus most of the new album. "Another Round of Blues" was a highlight in a show that contained nothing but highlights! And for encores she played ample, stark covers of the Talking Heads ("This Must Be the Place") and The Police ("Magic").
     If you like fine guitaring, well-written songs, and enjoy being mezmerized, I heartily recommend you check her out. (c. 1993, mjmjminla@yahoo.com)

I didn't know all that much about her...she really is fabulous live, and her band is incredibly talented. (carnivore@bigfoot.com)

Recommended first album:

Fat City is probably the most well-rounded example of Shawn's music. It's also a fair representation of her live sound with a band. For a sample of her sparse but powerful solo work, check out Live '88. (Greg Dunn)

Steady On for folk purists. Otherwise, Fat City. (JoAnn Whetsell)

Recordings:


Steady On

Release info:

1989—Columbia—CK 45209

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Highly recommended

Group members:

Shawn Colvin—acoustic guitar, keyboards, drum programming, vocals

Guest artists:

John Leventhal—electric guitar, acoustic guitar, mandolin, keyboards, bass, drum programming, background vocals
T-Bone Wolk—bass
Michael Blair—percussion
Bob Riley—electric guitar, drum programming, keyboards
Rick Marotta—drums
Dennis McDermott—drums
Bruce Hornsby—piano
Steven Gaboury—drum programming
Steve Addabbo—tambourine
Hugh McCracken—acoustic guitar, dobro
Bob Telson—Hammond organ
Charles Curtis—cello
Suzanne Vega, Lucy Kaplansky, Soozie Tyrell—background vocals

Produced by:

John Leventhal and Steve Addabbo

Comments:

Grammy-winning debut album full of strong songwriting and performances. (Greg Dunn)

I must admit when I first heard Steady On I was a bit disappointed. The album version of "Shotgun" had too much instrumentation and not enough soul. But after many months Steady On began to grow on me. After coming to love Fat City, I went back to Steady On and noticed things I had missed before. (mjmjminla@yahoo.com)

I'm not sure what I think of this—I really like the first few tracks, then it kind of blurs—I'm not sure if it's the music or just that I stop paying attention. ;) I think I'll have to play it a lot and let it grow on me. I see potential here. Great lyrics, except for a few...little...lines here and there that bother me. (NyxNight@aol.com)

I must speak for Shawn Colvin's work; "Shotgun Down The Avalanche" and "Orion" are pretty misty stuff, brilliantly arranged. Though her covers of Steve Earle's "Someday" and the Talking Heads' "Naive Melody" are similarly tear-jerking. What a performer; what a songwriter. (Greg Dunn)

Steady On was my first encounter with Shawn Colvin. This album is representative of a particularly tumultuous time in my life. "Shotgun Down the Avalanche," in my opinion, is a brilliantly written piece. It was, and still is, to me the embodiment of every destructive relationship I've ever known. Steady On is the ultimate "cigarette glowing in the dark" disc. Shawn Colvin's guitar playing moved me in such a way that during my own time of writing songs, I chose to pick up the guitar instead of writing on piano. This was a pinnacle point in my life—there was a fresh new approach to my writing. (kmichaels@kmichaels.com)

With all this discussion regarding artists' different sound on record or live, I'm reminded of my disappointment with hearing Shawn Colvin's "Shotgun Down the Avalanche" post studio production. (kammerzj@peak.org)

To me, this is just a stunning piece of work, and Shawn's best. One of those rare albums that is a great *album* and not just an album of great songs. Also the most purely contemporary folk, Grammy winner of its year in that category. I'm surprised at its lukewarm reception here. The songwriting is excellent, and the delivery often emotionally intense in its very coolness. It's hard to pick out stand-outs because I love them all, but I think "The Story" and "Cry Like an Angel" really touch me every time I hear them, both lyrically and the way they're sung. (JoAnn Whetsell)


Fat City

Release info:

1992—Columbia—CK 47122

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Highly recommended

Group members:

Shawn Colvin—6 & 12-string electric and acoustic guitars, vocals

Guest artists:

Larry Klein—bass, piano, keyboards
John Leventhal—electric & acoustic guitars
Steuart Smith—electric guitars
Vinnie Colaiuta—drums
Booker T. Jones—Hammond organ
Bruce Hornsby—piano, background vocals
Richard Thompson—electric guitars
Greg Leisz—pedal steel guitar
Chris Whitley—National guitar
Jim Keltner—drums
Alex Acuña—percussion
Joni Mitchell—percussion
Bela Fleck—banjo
Larry Campbell—pedal steel guitar
Bill Payne—organ
David Lindley—Weisenborn Hawaiian guitar
Denny Fongheiser—drums
Tommy Malone—electric & acoustic guitars, vocals
John Magnie—accordion, vocals
Johnny Ray Allen—bass
Steve Amedee—tambourine drum, vocals
David Lindley—bouzouki
Vinnie Zummo—electric guitar
Richie Hayward—percussion
Kenny White—keyboards
Sammy Merendino—drum programming
Mary Chapin Carpenter, Valerie Carter, Fonzie Thornton, Curtis King, Milt Grayson, Robin Batteau, Kenny White—background vocals

Produced by:

Larry Klein; additional production by John Leventhal, Kenny White, David Kahne, Shawn Colvin

Comments:

A terrific and complete example of mature songwriting/performing. (Greg Dunn)

Who would have thought that she could break out of the depression that she was in during the album Steady On!? Fat City is a tribute to all women in life who are going through metamorphosis—like a caterpillar to a butterfly. It's as if she becomes friends with herself for the very first time. Yet another album with which I can identify. Most of the cuts on this CD have just enough optimism and moodiness to keep you going from song to song. From "Polaroids" all the way to "I Don't Know Why" it's a journey of lessons learned and fresh new perspectives on life. (kmichaels@kmichaels.com)

Fat City, unlike Steady On, stuck with me almost right away. This, again, is a brilliant album but do give it some listens. (mjmjminla@yahoo.com)

This is an album I could never forget, but I hadn't listened to it in a while. This tape (bought after reading a review in a magazine) got me through my junior year of high school, a really difficult year in my life. It's got a range of somber, upbeat, fun, and heartbreakingly painful songs in a range of musical styles. There is a lot of pain on this album, but I think it's more about survival of pain. Songs like "Climb On (A Back That's Strong), "Round of Blues," and "Object of My Affection" always encourage me. In some ways, this album is perhaps slightly more uneven than Steady On, but that may just be due to its greater stylistic range. In another sense, those same qualities make it the great album it is. Incidental trivia: The Jane in "Kill the Messenger" is none other than Jane Siberry, and the song was written after seeing Jane in concert. (JoAnn Whetsell)


Cover Girl

Release info:

1994—Columbia—CK57875

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Highly recommended

Group members:

Shawn Colvin—acoustic guitar, vocals

Guest artists:

Steve Addabbo—12-string guitar
T-Bone Wolk—accordion, bass
David Kahne—keyboards, bass, programming
Steuart Smith—acoustic & electric guitars, slide guitar, Ferrington high-string & baritone guitars, mandolin, keyboards, bass
Jim Keltner—drums
Andy Kravitz—drums
Larry Campbell—pedal steel guitar, fiddle
Benmont Tench—Hammond B-3 organ
Lee Sklar—bass
Larry Klein—bass
Frank Vilardi—drums, percussion
Kenny Aronoff—drums, percussion
Mary Chapin Carpenter, Milt Grayson, Kenny White, Curtis King, Frank Floyd, Fonzie Thornton—background vocals

Produced by:

David Kahne, Shawn Colvin, Steuart Smith

Comments:

All cover tunes, all completely revitalized by Shawn's performances. Do not miss her interpretations of "Every Little Thing", "Someday", "Naive Melody", and "You're Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go." (Greg Dunn)

When Cover Girl came out, I was quick to pass the usual judgement that comes out of a musician's mouth—you know..."well I guess she had to fill her requirement with Columbia." Then I listened. Fairly unimpressed with "Every Little Thing" I wasn't quick to hang on for the ride. Filled with the curiosity that killed the cat and my love for Shawn Colvin, I figured "why the heck not, let's give it a go." At first pass, the only song that "stuck" was "One Cool Remove." Her duet with Mary Chapin Carpenter in counterpoint to the arrangement of the guitars and keys left me breathless. I fixated on that one song for at least one full week before I really gave a full listen to the album again. I quickly became aware that this was not an album of just "any old songs" plucked from straight-up oldies. Being the avid fan that I am, I delved deeper into the album and found songs like "Killing the Blues" and "If These Walls Could Speak." Should I ever have the opportunity to do an album of cover tunes, I only pray I have the good judgement she had when she chose the songs for this one. (kmichaels@kmichaels.com)

I probably wouldn't have bought this if I had known it was all covers, but I would have really missed out. I'm still not crazy about her version of "Every Little Thing" but most everything else is beautiful. It's amazing that these songs are so personal. My favorite is the duet with Mary Chapin Carpenter on "One Cool Remove" but the whole album is really stellar. And I love the comments on each song in the liner notes. (JoAnn Whetsell)


Live '88

Release info:

1995—plump Records—5901-2

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

A must for fans of Shawn Colvin

Group members:

Shawn Colvin—guitar, vocals

Produced by:

Carol Young

Comments:

Raw, uneven—and priceless. A great snapshot of Shawn's inimitable style and high energy in a live setting before she became "famous". (Greg Dunn)

Before I heard this album I had already seen a live performance myself—I was fortunate enough to see her on the Fat City tour. Her sound in the flesh is so full when it's just her with the guitar or with the entire band. I didn't think her performance would easily transfer to disc. I didn't feel a big need to run out and buy this album. Instead, on one of my birthdays, my husband purchased this disc for me. BOY WAS I WRONG! If you don't buy this album for any other reason, give a listen to her cover of Paul Simon's "Kathy's Song" and David Ball's "Don't You Think I Feel It Too." You'll find that on the smallest boombox, she's still right there in the room with you. (kmichaels@kmichaels.com)

This is a full release of a tape that was available only at shows before Steady On launched her career. (JoAnn Whetsell)


A Few Small Repairs

Release info:

1996—Columbia—CK 67119

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Recommended

Group members:

Shawn Colvin—acoustic guitar, trash can, vocals

Guest artists:

John Leventhal—guitars, bass, keyboards, harmonica, percussion, string arrangement, mandolin, violin, organ, vocals
Shawn Pelton—drums, percussion
Michael Rhodes—bass
Mark Plati—bass
Sandra Park—violin
Carol Webb—violin
Robert Rinehart—viola
Eugene Move—cello
Rick DePofi—tenor sax, bass clarinet, Mellotron
Chris Botti—trumpet
Larry Farrell—trombone
Bob Carlisle—French horn
Tony Kadlek—flugelhorn
Kate Markowitz, Lyle Lovett, Danny Ferrington, Judith Owen—background vocals

Produced by:

John Leventhal

Comments:

Not quite the tour de force of her previous studio albums, but a finely polished and enjoyable work. Also a Grammy-winning recording. (Greg Dunn)

This is quite wonderful. I really like this disc. My first Shawn, and definitely not my last. I enjoy all songs. (Matt.Bittner)

I've always found Shawn Colvin extremely talented but unoriginal. Up to this album, she's been a talented, unoriginal Folksinger(tm), a sound which I have little use for. Now that she's completely changed her career path and become a talented, unoriginal Jane-Siberry-impersonator, I like her sound more, but I think she'd really be something to contend with if she had the courage to strike out on her own, creatively. There's safety in other singers' numbers. (lissener@wwa.com)

A Few Small Repairs! Couldn't we all use some? I could be totally off the mark here, but this seemed to be her "coming out" album. As everyone experiences in their lives, a broken heart is not easy to mend. First we get hurt, then we cry, then we get mad, then we get depressed and then we grow. This album was about empowerment for me. This was a trip through falling down, getting back up and getting on with it. No wonder she won the Grammy with this one. Shawn and John Leventhal are a powerful combination. These are the kind of lyrics and music that grip me so deeply and don't let go. Kind of like the best friend that you never want to lose. (kmichaels@kmichaels.com)

It took me a while, but I like this album okay, some of it very much. And if the singer were someone else, I would probably think it was much better than I think it is. It just isn't as good as Colvin's earlier work. It's not a bad album, but I was expecting more from Ms. Colvin. It is definitely the most pop, most mainstream, of her albums, and it's interesting to note that she won a Grammy for her debut in the contemporary folk category, and 2 Grammys for "sunny came home" in mainstream categories. Even with all the overplay, "Sunny" is still a good song. But the real gems here are "Trouble," "Wichita Skyline," and "New Thing Now." (JoAnn Whetsell)

Speaking of Shawn Colvin's new one, I'm not a Colvin fan by a long shot, but I really like what I've heard of the disc. (meth@smoe.org)


Holiday Songs and Lullabies

Release info:

1998—Columbia—CK69550

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Highly recommended

Group members:

Shawn Colvin—acoustic guitar, vocals

Guest artists:

Steuart Smith—guitar
Dan Petty—guitar, lap steel guitar
Ben Street—acoustic & electric basses
Shawn Pelton—drums Larry Campbell—pedal steel guitar, mandolin, violin
Sandra Park—violin
Sharon Yamada—violin
Rebecca Young—viola
Alan Stepansky—cello
Dan Willis—oboe
Kenny Rampton—flugelhorn
John Clark—French horn
Jim Pugh—trombone
David Taylor—bass trombone
Clark Gayton—euphonium
Doug Petty—piano, organ
Mark Egan—bass
Andy Hess—bass
Marlon Saunders, Jill Seifers, Paul Frazier—background vocals

Produced by:

Doug Petty

Comments:

"If I Were Brave" from A Few Small Repairs...guess what Shawn? You obviously are brave. It never ceases to amaze me how a child can change your life. With this album, Shawn shows a softer, quieter, more peaceful side of herself. Having two daughters of my own, I can understand what it feels like to go through the transformation of "I've been hurt and I'm mad" to "God, I've never felt so much love in my life." Once again, amazing arrangements—this time mixed with the fullness of strings. My hat goes off to you, Shawn. (kmichaels@kmichaels.com)

Did becoming a mother for the first time change Shawn? She recorded this in June 1998, while she was 8-1/2 months pregnant. It had to have some kind of effect! Holiday Songs and Lullabies was inspired by a book given to her when she was eight by her mother and father, called "Lullabies & Night Songs", illustrated by Maurice Sendak. Shawn cherished this book and many of the songs on the recording are found in the book. Yes, many of these are "seasonal songs" but it doesn't stop one from listening to this any time of the year. (lstubbs@inforamp.net)

It's just beautiful. Very listenable all year round, whether as a late-night album or something for peaceful quiet times or to create calm. It's just wonderful, right down to the cd design, for which she got permission to use Maurice Sendak illustrations. (JoAnn Whetsell)


Whole New You

Release info:

2001—Columbia—CK 85448

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Highly recommended for fans

Group members:

Shawn Colvin—vocals

Guest artists:

John Leventhal—guitars, keyboards, percussion, bass, banjo, piano, horn arrangements, all instruments on "Nothing Like You"
Shawn Pelton—drums, percussion
Michael Rhodes—bass
Sandra Park—violin
Fiona Simon—violin
Robert Rinehart—viola
Alan Stepansky—cello
Eileen Moon—cello
Stephen Barber and John Leventhal—string arrangements
Joe Bonadio—drum fills, percussion
James Taylor—harmony on "Bonefields"
Marc Cohn and Kenny White—background vocals on "Bonefields"
Tony Kadlek—flugelhorn, trumpet
Larry Farrell—trombone
Rick Depofi—piccolo, recorder, tenor sax, clarinet, bass clarinet
Joe Quigley—bass
Charlie Sexton—harmony on "Roger Wilco"
The LBO Strings—strings on "One Small Year"
Tony Garnier—upright bass

Produced by:

John Leventhal

Comments:

Very nice effort from a singer I should check out some more. (stjarnell@yahoo.com)

Polaroids

Copy-protected disc

Release info:

2004—Columbia Records—CK 93452

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Not recommended

Group members:

Shawn Colvin—acoustic guitar, vocals (15)

Guest artists:

Steuart Smith—lead acoustic guitar (15)
John Alagia—Hammond B3, B3 bass pedals

Produced by:

John Leventhal, Steve Addabbo, Larry Klein, Kenny White, David Kahne, Shawn Colvin, Steuart Smith

Comments:

As a long-time fan of Shawn Colvin's who owns all her albums, this compilation is a disappointment. The linear progression of songs from her five major studio albums, the lack of liner notes, and the absence of new material save for a rather unspectacular Beatles cover, mean there is no new insight into Shawn's music. Considering this was her last release on Columbia Records, I suspect it was put together to satisfy contractual obligations.
      On a bright note, the companion DVD (sold separately) of music videos and live performances is excellent. Buy that instead. (JoAnn Whetsell)

These Four Walls

Release info:

2006—Nonesuch Records—79937-2

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Highly recommended

Group members:

Shawn Colvin—acoustic guitar, vocals

Guest artists:

John Leventhal—guitars, bass, keyboards, percussion, mandolin, dobro, pedal steel
Shawn Pelton—drums, percussion
Rick Depofi—percussion, horns on "So Good to See You"
Patty Griffin—vocals on "Cinnamon Road"
Marc Cohn—vocals on "Cinnamon Road"
Teddy Thompson—vocals on "Let It Slide"
Antoine Silverman—fiddle on "Tuff Kid"
Greg Leisz—pedal steel on "These Four Walls"

Produced by:

John Leventhal

Comments:

Shawn Colvin's last studio album Whole New You was dismal, and the new song on Polaroids, her greatest hits collection, was pretty dull. So I was extremely happily surprised by how good her new album is. These Four Walls is similar folk-pop to A Few Small Repairs but lighter sounding somehow, and probably a better album overall. Great tunes, great arrangements, and an overall cheeriness without being sappy, though she does touch on darker themes like depression and stagnation. Highly, highly recommended for fans or anyone who enjoys the contemporary folk-pop scene. (JoAnn Whetsell)

Live

Release info:

2009—Nonesuch—310140-2

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Highly recommended

Group members:

Shawn Colvin

Produced by:

Shawn Colvin and John Leventhal

Comments:

A brilliant solo acoustic set that really showcases the power of Shawn's voice and her songwriting. Includes 2 or 3 songs from each of her 6 major studio albums, plus a striking rendition of Gnarls Barkley's "Crazy." (JoAnn Whetsell)

All Fall Down

Release info:

2012—Nonesuch—530682-2

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Highly recommended

Group members:

Shawn Colvin—vocals, guitar

Guest artists:

Buddy Miller—guitar (1–4, 6–10); backing vocals (1, 6); harmony vocal (3); melodica (6)
Bill Frisell—guitar (1, 2, 4, 5, 8–10)
John Deaderick—keyboard (1, 3, 6, 8, 9); accordion (1, 7, 10, 11)
Viktor Krauss—bass (1–11)
Brian Blade—drums (1–10)
Anne McCrary, Regina McCrary, Mike Poole, Carolyn Rosenfeld—backing vocals (1, 6)
Stuart Duncan—bowed zither (2), fiddle (3, 7)
Emmylou Harris—harmony vocal (2, 10)
Russ Pahl—pedal steel guitar (4, 5, 7, 10, 11)
Alison Krauss—harmony vocal (4, 8)
Jim Hoke—clarinet (6)
Steve Heman—cornet (6)
Jakob Dylan—harmony vocal (9)
Julie Miller—harmony vocal (11)

Produced by:

Buddy Miller

Comments:

Another great album from Shawn Colvin. The first 4 tracks are especially excellent, and the album does wander a bit after that (track 5, tying a modern failed marriage to Anne Boleyn's story is unbearable; track 9 has too many clichés), but overall it's a solid addition to a great body of work. (JoAnn Whetsell)

Uncovered

Release info:

2015—Concord—FAN-37415-02

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Highly recommended

Group members:

Shawn Colvin—vocals, guitar

Guest artists:

Marc Cohn—vocals (8)
David Crosby—vocals (3)
Glenn Fukunaga—bass, upright bass
Mike Meadows—percussion
David Boyle—keyboards
Milo Deering—pedal steel, lap steel, mandola
Stewart Smith—guitars, keyboards, bass (2)

Produced by:

Steuart Smith and Stewart Lerman

Comments:

Shawn Colvin's second album of covers is perhaps as good as her first (I've been loving that album for more than twenty years). The songs are, again, mostly ones I'm not familiar with (and, perhaps interestingly, all by male songwriters, with the exception of Kathleen Brennan's co-write with Tom Waits). I do think Cover Girl had more variety in mood and tempo, so Uncovered can seem a bit samey, but somehow I don't mind. (JoAnn Whetsell)

Further info:

Shawn Colvin released a video collection Polaroids in 2004. She published a memoir, Diamond in the Rough, in 2012.

Her work appears on many compilations and soundtracks. Songs only available on compilations include:

  • "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" on Acoustic Christmas (1990)
  • "Love Me Tender on Blue Suede Sneakers (1995)
  • "Viva Las Vegas" on Till the Night Is Gone: A Tribute to Doc Pomus (1995)
  • "Someone Like You" on the One Fine Day soundtrack (1996)
  • "Between Two Worlds" on the Grace of My Heart soundtrack (1996)
  • "Back to Salome" on the Tin Cup soundtrack (1996)
  • "When the Rainbow Comes" on the Armageddon soundtrack (1998)
  • "The Chain" on Legacy: A Tribute to Fleetwood Mac's Rumours (1998)
  • a live version of "Trouble" on Lilith Fair: A Celebration of Women in Music (1998)
  • "Never Saw Blue Like That" on the Runaway Bride soundtrack (1999)
  • a live version of "New Thing Now" on Lilith Fair: A Celebration of Women in Music, Volume 2 (1999)
  • "But Beautiful" on AT&T Presents Stormy Weather (1999)
  • a live version of "Diamond in the Rough" on the Best of Sessions at West 54th (2001)
  • "When You Know" on the Serendipity soundtrack (2001)
  • "Say a Little Prayer" on Going Driftless: An Artist's Tribute to Greg Brown (2002)
  • "Hold on to the Good Things" on the Stuart Little 2 soundtrack (2002)
  • a live version of "I Don't Know Why" on Fast Folk: A Community of Singers and Songwriters (2003)
  • "Fly" on the Because of Winn-Dixie soundtrack (2005)
  • a live version of "Summer Dress" on The Artist's Den: Volume Three (2006)
  • "Secret Gardens" on Born to the Breed: A Tribute to Judy Collins (2008)
  • "I Can't Stop Loving You" and "Tennessee Waltz" on the Crazy soundtrack (2010)
  • "All He Wants Is You" on This One's for Him: A Tribute to Guy Clark (2011)
  • "Time Will Tell" on The Best of Times (2011)
Collaborations include:

  • <"I'm Talkin' to You" with Mark Dann on Fast Folk Musical Magazine, Volume 1, No. 3 (1982)
  • "Knowing What I Know Now" with Lucy Kaplansky on Fast Folk Musical Magazine, Volume 3, No. 6: Live at the Bottom Line (1986)
  • "My Name Joe" with David Massengill, Lucy Kaplansky, and Willie Nininger on Fast Folk Musical Magazine, Volume 3, No. 6: Live at the Bottom Line (1986)
  • "I Know" with John Gorka, Lucy Kaplansky, and Rod MacDonald on Fast Folk Musical Magazine, Volume 3, No. 6: Live at the Bottom Line (1986)
  • "Heart on Ice" and "Goodnight" with Lucy Kaplansky on Fast Folk Musical Magazine, Volume 3, No. 7: Live at the Bottom Line (1986)
  • a live version of "One Cool Remove" with John Gorka on Fast Folk Musical Magazine, Volume 5, No. 3: Live at the Bottom Line (1990)
  • Real Life" with Nikki Matheson and Rod MacDonald on Fast Folk Musical Magazine, Volume 5, No. 3: Live at the Bottom Line (1990)
  • "You Ain't Goin' Nowhere" with Mary Chapin Carpenter and Rosanne Cash on Bob Dylan: The 30th Anniversary Concert Celebration (1993)
  • "A Heart Needs a Home" with Loudon Wainwright III on Beat the Retreat: Songs by Richard Thompson (1994)
  • "Young at Heart" with Tony Bennett on the It Could Happen to You soundtrack (1994)
  • "Round of Blues" with Mary Chapin Carpenter on The Best of the Columbia Records Radio Hour, Volume 2 (1996)
  • "I Don't Want to Live on the Moon" with Ernie on Sesame Street: Elmopalooza! (1998)
  • "Faded Love" with Asleep at the Wheel and Lyle Lovett on Asleep at the Wheel's album Ride With Bob (1999)
  • "One Day She Will Love Me" with Sting on The Emperor's New Groove soundtrack (2000)
  • "Trippin' on My Own Tears" with Ringo Starr on his album Ringo Rama (2003)
  • "Single Girl, Married Girl" with Earl and Randy Scruggs on The Unbroken Circle: The Musical Heritage of the Carter Family (2004)
  • "Set the Prairie on Fire" with Will Taylor and Strings Attached on their album Collaborations (2005)
  • "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" with Viktor Kraus on his album Viktor Krauss II (2007)
  • "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall" with Ann Wilson and Rufus Wainwright on Wilson's album Hope & Glory (2007)
  • "He's the Man" with The Simpsons on the album The Simpsons: Testify (2007)
  • "Hallelujah" with Patty Larkin on her album 25 (2010)
  • "That's the Way Love Goes" with Buddy Miller on his album The Majestic Silver Strings (2011)
  • "Lotta Love" with Jason Mraz on A MusiCares Tribute to Neil Young (2011)


Thanks to Greg Dunn, Mike Mendelson, Mark Miazga, Katheleen Michaels, Lesley Stubbs, and JoAnn Whetsell for work on this entry.

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