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Angélique Kidjo


Country of origin:

Benin. Currently resides in Paris, France

Type of music generally:

World music, pop/rock, dance

Status:

Most recent release, Angélique Kidjo Sings with the Orchestre Philharmonique du Luxembourg (live, 2015); most recent studio release, Eve (2014)

See also:

Angélique Kidjo Homepage

Covers/own material:

Own and co-written, occasional cover

General comments:

Angélique Kidjo is an amazing singer-songwriter from Benin, a tiny country in West Africa. She sings in English, French, and her native languages of Yoruba and Fon. Her music—well, there's that powerful voice that's comfortable in different languages, stylistic influences from traditional African music to rock, pop, r&b and hip-hop. She uses both African and western instruments. Most of her songs are upbeat, danceable, very rhythmic. But her slower songs and ballads are equally excellent. (JoAnn Whetsell)

Glad to see someone else out there liking Angélique Kidjo. Her talents blew me away when I first heard her a couple of years ago. For those who like "World Music" she is really awesome. The energy she brings to her songs is very invigorating and infectious, and the sound is different enough to make it very interesting stuff. (joc@netaxs.com)

Comments about live performance:

I saw Angelique in the fall of 1998 here at Oberlin, which was the first stop on her U.S. tour for Oremi. It was one of the best concerts I've been to EVER. Hands down. She had so much energy; she had the entire crowd on their feet dancing before the end of the first song, and kept them that way the whole time. She played mostly songs from Oremi and Fifa, but also some older songs and a ballad she said had been made famous by Miriam Makeba—so beautiful. Also her dancing and the back-up singers, dressed in African costume, and colorful prints draping the stage added to the incredible performance. (JoAnn Whetsell)

Angélique Kidjo was awesome. She's much shorter than I thought she'd be, but has a really great smile. The show features a lot of songs from her latest album Fifa (meaning "Peace"), and the new stuff sounds great. Many of the songs feature English choruses—which is a departure for her, but they still sound great. She toured with two backup singers, a drummer, a percussionist, a keyboardist, guitarist, bass, and a pretty wild dancer. For the first 40 minutes or so, it was all new material, but then she covered all my favorites including "Batonga", and an awesome version of "Adouma" which had everyone dancing—not just the people on the dance floor. She then came out and did an encore consisting of two songs, a ballad and "Agolo". A great show that was a lot of fun. Her voice is so loud, powerful and clear—though I do wish she worked on her dynamics a little more. Even her ballads are loud, powerful and clear—which can get a little tiresome, but the danceable rhythms more than make up for it. (4/96, jjhanson@att.net)

Recommended first album:

Fifa

Recordings:


Logozo

Release info:

1991—Island Records France—422-510 352-4

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Recommended

Group members:

Angélique Kidjo—vocals

Guest artists:

Jean Hebrail—bass
Joe Galdo—drums, percussions
Lester Mendez—keyboards
Joao Mota—guitar
Gary King—guitar
Yves N'Djock—guitar
Moussa Sissokho—percussion
Djanuno D'Abo—percussion
Myriam Betty—background vocals
N'Dedy Dibango—background vocals
Branford Marsalis—saxophone
Manu Dibango-saxophone
Ray Lema—background vocals

Produced by:

Joe Galdo

Comments:

Strong debut. It has the wonderfully energetic "Batonga" and the incredibly beautiful "Malaika," which Angelique notes is a traditional Tanzanian chant, sung in Swahili, popularized by Miriam Makeba. (JoAnn Whetsell)

Aye

Release info:

1994—Island Records—162-539 934-4

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Highly recommended

Group members:

Angélique Kidjo—vocals

Guest artists:

Paul Peterson—guitar
Dave Z.—guitar, drum programming
Carol Steele—percussion
Lester Mendez—Hammond, Wurlitzer, piano, synthesizers, drum programming
Jean Hebrail—keyboards, bass guitar, programming, arrangements, drum programming
Jevetta Steele, Jearlyn Steele, JD Steele, Fred Steele (the Steeles); Ingrid Matsidisi Webster, Damel Carayol, Julie Imani Payne, Enyonam Gbesemete (Body and Soul); Lama Al-Mugheiry, Claudia Fontaine—backing vocals
Andy Gangadeen—drums
David Fall—drums
Luis Jardim—percussion
Jacques Largent—percussion
Chris Davis—saxophones, brass arrangements
John Thirkell—trumpet
Neil Sidwell—trombone
Julian Crampton—double bass
Glenn Nightingale—guitars
Will Mowat—keyboards, arranging, programming

Produced by:

David Z., Will Mowat

Comments:

Another great album by Angelique. Bright and upbeat with a good variety of styles, tempos. Another must for fans. (JoAnn Whetsell)

Fifa

Release info:

1996—Island Records

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Very highly recommended

Group members:

Angélique Kidjo—vocals

Guest artists:

Lester Mendez—keyboards
David Fall—drums
Jacob Desvarieux—guitars
Glenn Nightingale—guitars
Snake Davis—saxophones, brass arrangement
John Thirkell—trumpet
Dennis Rollins—trombone
Carlos Santana—guitar
Luis Conte—percussions
Sanjay Divecha—acoustic guitar
Jabu Khanyile Bayete, Wings Segale, Busi Mhlongo, Khanyo Maphumulo, Khululiwe Sithole, Ray Lema, Debbie Davis, Beckie Bell, Joniece Jamison, Yvonne Jones, Mike Robinson—backing vocals
Beninese musicians—cotonou, ouidah, abomey, portonovo, kouaba, korontiere, kouande, natitingou, badjoude, bassila, manigri, azizakwe

Produced by:

Jean Hebrail

Comments:

Her most accomplished album, I think. Angelique went back to Benin because she wanted to capture the music of her childhood, and a lot of native musicians played on the album. It's a rich tapestry crossing cultures, languages, musical styles. And it's just filled with awesome grooves. I can't adequately describe it; I can't say how much I love it; I can't recommend it enough. (JoAnn Whetsell)

Oremi

Release info:

1998—Island Records—314-524 521-2

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Highly recommended

Group members:

Angélique Kidjo—vocals

Guest artists:

Bashiri Johnson—percussion
Peter Mokran—guitar, keyboards, bass, drums, programming
DeMonte Possey—Wurlitzer, rhodes
George Nash, Jr.—guitar
Vincent N'Guini—guitar
Jean Hebrail—keyboards, programming
Ronny Drayton—guitar
Bakithi Kumalo—bass
David Sancious—Wurlitzer
Kenny Kirkland—Wurlitzer, rhodes
Skoota Warner—drums
Ira Siegal—acoustic guitar
Tom Barney—acoustic bass
Paul Griffen—B-3 organ
Branford Marsalis—soprano saxophone
Ahmir Thompson—drums
T.M. Stevens—bass
Wah Wah Watson—guitar
Kelly Price—lead vocal
David Mirandon—percussion
Sibongile Makgate, Wendy Meleku, Mandisa Dlamga, Puleng Wings Segale, Victor Mzumato, Tommy Farragher—backing vocals
Cassandra Wilson—scat vocals

Comments:

"Oremi" translates as "friend". This album has the most Western influences on it: from r&b and hip-hop influences, some jazz even, to a Jimi Hendrix cover to appearances by Cassandra Wilson and Kelly Price. For the most part it works very well, but my favorite songs on here are the ones that are sung all or mostly not in English such as "Babalao" "Loloye" and "Orubaba". (JoAnn Whetsell)

A friend turned me on to her. With this album someone decided she should be more mainstream R-n-Bish, to get her "known", before they drop her from her label. NO african influences!!! Only 1 song listenable, in my opinion and my friend's, "Voodoo Chile". Slight return—no guitar, a favorite from her youth, kinda neat. (shudder) What the suits do to talent!!!! (zzkwhite@ktwu.wuacc.edu)


Keep On Moving: The Best of Angélique Kidjo

Release info:

2001—Sony Records—85758

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Recommended

Group members:

Angélique Kidjo—vocals, all instruments (1)

Guest artists:

Thierry Vaton—Rhodes, piano (1)
Jean Hebrail—programming (1)
Wah-Wah Watson—guitars (8)
Djao Mota—guitar (7)
Djanuno Dabo—percussion(7)
Kelly Price—vocals (8)
Carlos Santana (11)
Christian Lachenal—programming (14)
Ray Lema—vocals (18)

Produced by:

Jean Hebrail, Peter "PM" Mokran, Will Mowat, Joe Galdo, David Z.

Comments:

Keep on Moving is Angélique's first compilation. I haven't actually heard it, but I'm intrigued by the inclusion of "Summertime," a new recording. The songs chosen represent her 5 previous albums well, though I might have chosen some different ones. (JoAnn Whetsell)

Black Ivory Soul

Release info:

2002—Columbia—CK 85799

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Highly recommended

Group members:

Angélique Kidjo—lead and background vocals, music arrangements

Guest artists:

Dave Matthews—guest vocals on "Iwoya"
Brenda White-King, Cindy Mizelle, Dennis Collins, Curtis King—additional background vocals on "Black Ivory Soul" and "Afirika"
Joao Mota, Dominic Kanza—electric guitar
Romero Lubambo—nylon string guitar
Vinicius Cantuária—acoustic guitar on "Olofoofo"
Rubens De La Corte—acoustic guitar on "Bahia"
Bernie Worrell—organ and fender rhodes
Mahamadou Diabate—kora
Michel Alibo—electric bass
Ira Coleman—acoustic bass
Gilmar Iglesias Gomes—Brazilian percussion
Abdou Mboup, Aiyb Dieng, Cheick M'baye—African percussion
Ahmir "?uestlove" Thompson—drums
Karl Berger—material strings arrangement and conducting
Juliann Klopotic, Cathy Yang—violin
Kathy Sinsabaugh—viola
Tara Chambers—cello
Jean Hebrail—music arrangements

Comments:

It sounds very good. I'm not sure if it's something I'd listen to a lot, but it was good, bouncy stuff that it would be doing a disservice to label as "Afro-Pop". The single features Dave Matthews on vocals, and sounds like it could have "hit" potential, if top-40 radio sees fit to pay attention to something that's not prepackaged teenie dreck for a change. (meth@smoe.org)

Oyaya!

Release info:

2004—Columbia Records—CK 89053

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Highly recommended

Group members:

Angélique Kidjo—vocals

Guest artists:

Alberto Salas—piano, keyboards, rhythm arrangements
Rene Camacho—basses
Ramon Stagnaro—tres, guitars
Dominic Kanza—African guitars
Walter Rodriguez—drums, percussion
Michito Sanchez—percussion
Tata Vega, James Felix—backing vocals
Francisco Torres—trombones and horn arrangements
Justo Almario—tenor and alto sax
Luis-Eric Gonzalez—trumpet
Steve Berlin—baritone sax
Abou Sylla—balafon
Mamadou Diabete—kora
Andy Narrell—steel pans on "Oulala"
Jacob Desvarieux—guitar and vocals on "Dje Dje L'Aye"
Kayemb, Sanza—strings arrangement
Julien Chirol—clave
Hervér Bault—guitar, cavalquinho
Diego Imbert, Vincent Artaud—upright bass
Joan Rouzaud, Anne Sophie Courderot, Vanessa Ugarte, Frederic Maindive, Florent Carriere—strings
Thomas Ostrowiecki—gourd, daf, triangle, hand bells

Produced by:

Steve Berlin & Alberto Salas

Comments:

Oyaya! is a high-spirited album. It is impossible to listen to it without moving, even if I'm only dancing in my chair. The third in Angélique's series of albums exploring the influence of African music in the diaspora, Oyaya! takes on Afro-Latin/Caribbean music. Even more than the previous 2 albums (Oremi which explored American music and Black Ivory Soul which explored Brazilian music), Oyaya! blends the music rather than using it as an influence. I'm not sure which countries or styles of Caribbean music; her website mentions salsa, calypso, meringue, and ska. But it doesn't really matter. What matters is that it makes me smile, it makes me dance. Angélique's voice is as beautiful and sensual as ever, and so is the music. If you like dance-y Latin music, give this a try; if not, try one of Angélique's other albums instead. (JoAnn Whetsell)

Djin Djin

Release info:

2007—Razor & Tie—7930182967-2

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Highly recommended

Group members:

Angélique Kidjo—vocals

Guest artists:

Poogie Bell—drums
Habib Faye—bass
Crespin Kpitiki—percussion
Benoit Aviboue—percussion
Joao Mota—African guitar
Romero Lubambo—acoustic guitar
Dominic Kanza—guitar (1, 11, 12)
Lionel Loueke—guitar (3, 5, 6)
Larry Campbell—steel guitar (9, 11, 12)
Stuart Bogie, Jordan McLean, Aaron Johnson, Colin Stetson (Antibalas)—horns (3, 8)
Gregor Kitzis, Gabriel Schaff, Ron Lawrence, Matt Goeke—strings
Thandi Bhengu, Nompumelelo Skakane, Tsholofetso Mokubung—South African backing vocals
Amadou Bagayoko—guitar solo (5)
Keziah Jones—guitar solo (4, 10)
Onree Gill—keyboard (2)
Branford Marsalis—saxophone solo (2)
Alicia Keys—vocals (2)
Joss Stone—vocals (3)
Peter Gabriel—vocals (4)
Carlos Santana—guitar (6)
Josh Groban—vocals (6)
Ziggy Marley—vocals (7)

Produced by:

Tony Visconti

Comments:

Djin Djin is similar to Angélique's 1998 Oremi album, with lots of guest artists and exploration of the connections between music of Africa and the Western hemisphere. It's as upbeat, positive, and fun, but I think it's a stronger album. You can really hear her growth as an artist and the influence of the last years she's spent exploring the African roots of American, Brazilian, and Caribbean music. She covers the Rolling Stones' "Gimme Shelter" with Joss Stone, goes reggae with Ziggy Marley, and even does a vocal version of Ravel's "Bolero" which won me over despite much initial skepticism. The songs with just Angélique and her band are as strong as those with guests. And the quieter songs are as good as the fast ones. It's a testimony to her strength as an artist that amid the guests and the various styles she remains firmly in command of it all. (JoAnn Whetsell)

Õÿö

Release info:

2010—Razor & Tie

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Recommended

Group members:

Angélique Kidjo

Guest artists:

Jean Hebrail—arrangements
Larry Gold—string arrangements
Lionel Loueke—arrangements, guitars
Kendrick Scott—drums
Christian McBride—upright bass
Ibrahim "Thiokho" Diagne—percussion
Bono (U2)—vocals (3)
John Legend—vocals (3)
Dianne Reeves—vocal (7)
Roy Hargrove—horn (2)
Dominic Kanza—guitar (1, 15, 16)
Poogie Bell—drums (3)
Steve Gorn—flute (8)
The Antibalas Horns featuring Alex Harding, Cochemea Gastelum, Jordan McLean, Aaron Johnson, Stuart Bogie, Ian Hendrickson-Smith, Martin Perna—horns
Igor Szwec, Emma Kummrow—violins
Davis Barnett—viola
James Cooper—cello
Mamadou Diabate—kora
Balla Kouyate—balafon
Colette Alexander—cello (9)
Thandi Bhengu, Tuelo Minah, Tsholofetso Mokubung, and Clement Hlongwane—South African backing vocals

Produced by:

Angélique Kidjo and Jean Hebrail

Comments:

This album of music from her youth showcases Angélique's wide range of influences but is probably her most uneven album to date. I love spirited songs like "Zelie," "Kelele" and "Dil Mein Chhupa Ke Pyar Ka Too" while others are kind of boring. There are so many styles, including American R&B and soul, African traditionals, and Bollywood, that the songs don't fit together easily, particularly the collaborations with Dianne Reeves and with Bono and John Legend (on Curtis Mayfield's "Move On Up"), which just aren't great covers to begin with. Still there is much to like, and some of the parts are much better than the sum. (JoAnn Whetsell)

Spirit Rising

Release info:

2012—Razor & Tie

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Highly recommended

Group members:

Angélique Kidjo

Guest artists include:

Dianne Reeves on "Gimme Shelter" and "Monfe Ran E"
Josh Groban on "Pearls"
Branford Marsalis on "Move On Up" and "Lonlon"
Ezra Koenig (Vampire Weekend) on "I Think Ur a Contra"

Comments:

While it doesn't quite capture the energetic high of Angélique's live shows, it's pretty good. The material, originals and covers pulled from her albums and contributions to compilations, ranges widely in style and tempo, but fits together well. The cover of Curtis Mayfield's "Move On Up" (this time with Branford Marsalis) is better than the one on Õÿö with Bono and John Legend. And the new cover of Vampire Weekend's "I Think Ur a Contra" is wonderful. As a longtime fan with fond memories of seeing Angélique in concert, I'm pretty happy. (JoAnn Whetsell)

Eve

Release info:

2014—429 Records—FTN17968

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Highly recommended

Group members:

Angélique Kidjo

Guest artists:

Lionel Loueke—guitars
Dominic James—guitars and bass
Steve Jordan—drums
Christian McBride—bass
Jean Hebrail—programming and arrangements
Magatte Sow, Crespin Kpitiki, Benoit Avihoue—percussion
Tomas Barlett, Bahnamous Bowie—keyboards
Mark Degli Antoni—effects and keyboards
Gast Waltzing— Orchestre Philharmonique du Luxembourg arrangements and conducting (12)
Romero Lubambo—acoustic guitar (7)
Rostam Batmanglij—guitar (5); keyboards (6)
Dr. John—piano (9)
Bernie Worrell—organ (1, 5)
Joao Mota—guitar (9, 12)
Josapha Hounmou—drums (5, 8)
Manu Agossou—bass (5)
Kronos Quartet—strings (11)
Jacob Garchik—string arrangement (11)
David Harrington, John Sherba—violin
Hank Dutt—viola
Sunny Yang—cello
Massimo Biolcati—bass (12)
Jerry Barnes—bass (14)
Mauro Refosco—percussion (1, 3)
Stuart Bogie—saxophone (14)
Steve Bernstein—trombone (14)
Jared Tankel—baritone saxophone (14)
Dave "Smoota" Smith—trombone (14)
ASA—guest vocals (3)
Trio Teriba—vocals (6)
Yvonne Kidjo—vocals (13)
Tuelo Mina, Tsholo Mokubung—background vocals (16)
Merti Samburu choir—vocals
Bobonyon choir—vocals
Jessounoukon choir—vocals
Kossilate choir—vocals
Ifedoun choir—vocals
Nodeme choir—vocals
Miwanonvi choir—vocals
Yelognisse choir—vocals
Ibitayo choir—vocals

Produced by:

Patrick Dillett

Comments:

Angélique's latest album is dedicated to the women of Africa and has many of their voices on it, including her mother's. Angéélique's own voice is as powerful as ever, and the music is almost entirely upbeat and celebratory. It makes me smile and sing along, and it makes me want to dance. This is a good thing. Eve is a great album. (JoAnn Whetsell)

Angélique Kidjo Sings with the Orchestre Philharmonique du Luxembourg

Release info:

2015—429 Records—FTN16042

Availability:

Wide

Ecto priority:

Highly recommended

Group members:

Angélique Kidjo

Guest artists:

Orchestre Philharmonique du Luxembourg
Christian McBride—upright bass
Massimo Biolcati—upright bass
Lionel Loueke—guitar
Dominic James—guitar
David Laborier—guitar
Magatte Sow—percussion
Crespin Tpikiti—percussion
Benoit Avihoue—percussion
Tuelo Kgobokoe—background vocals
Tsholofetso Mokubung—background vocals
Gast Waltzing—flugelhorn solo (8)

Produced by:

Angélique Kidjo and Jean Hébrail

Comments:

I was pretty skeptical about the idea of Angélique singing with an orchestra, and while I don't love every track, I do think it's a mostly successful album and a good demonstration of bridging classical and African traditions. The best tracks ("Kelele," "Fifa," "Nanae") really bring out a different side to the songs compared to their original recordings. "Bahia," much darker here than the original version, is a good example. This continues to grow on me with every listen. (JoAnn Whetsell)

One of the best albums of the year. (raschee@gmail.com)


Further info:

Angélique Kidjo founded the Batonga Foundation for Girls Education in 2006. She published the memoir Spirit Rising: My Life, My Music in 2014. She contributed songs to the following compilations:

  • "Batonga" and "Logozo" on Africa Fête 93 (1993)
  • "Tché Tché" on Reggae on the River: Part 1 (1994)
  • "Tatchèdogbè" and "Houngbati" on Africa Fête 94 (1994)
  • "Ife"* on the Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls soundtrack (1995)
  • "Batonga" on Putumayo Presents: The Best of World Music—African (1995), African Heartbeat: The Essential African Music Collection (1998), and Holding Up Half the Sky: Voices of African Women (2005)
  • "Bitchifi" on One World (1996)
  • "Zan Vevede" (O Holy Night)* on World Christmas (1996)
  • "Summertime"* on Amazing Grace (1997)
  • a live version of "Never Know"* on Lilith Fair: A Celebration of Women in Music, Volume 2 (1999) and Best of Lilith Fair 1997 to 1999 (2010)
  • "Worth Fighting For"* on the Street Fighter soundtrack (2001)
  • "Bahia" on Putumayo Presents: Women of Africa (2004)
  • a live version of "Senie Zelie"* on Lightning in a Bottle (2004)
  • "Mutoto Kwanza"* on No Child Soldiers (2006)
  • "Sedjedo"* on Putumayo Presents: Acoustic Africa (2006)
  • a live version of "Agolo"* on Live 8 at Eden: Africa Calling (2007)
  • "Mysterious Ways"* on In the Name of Love: Africa Celebrates U2 (2008)
  • "Little Boxes"* on Weeds—Little Boxes Dime Bag #1 (2008)
  • "Afirika" on Beginner's Guide to the World (2008)
  • "Happy Xmas (War Is Over) [With Naima]"* on Instant Karma—The Amnesty International Campaign to Save Darfur (2009)
  • a cover of Bob Marley's "Redemption Song"* on Oh Happy Day (2009)
  • "Massalassi (Piano Reprise)"* on 1% for the Planet—The Music, Vol. 1 (2010)
  • "Ne Me Quitte Pas (If You Go Away)"* on Sweetheart 2010: Our Favorite Artists Sing Their Favorite Love Songs (2010)
  • "Leila"* on Raise Hope for Congo (2010)
  • "Agbalagba" on We Are the World / United in Song (2010)
  • "Battu"* on Care for Haiti (2011)
  • "Lay Lady Lay"* on Chimes of Freedom: The Songs of Bob Dylan—Honoring 50 Years of Amnesty International (2012)
  • "Lakutshona Llanga" on The Rough Guide to African Lullabies (2012)
*Track not available elsewhere.

Collaborations include:

  • "La Vie" with Philippe Saisse on his album Halfway Till Dawn (1999)
  • "Deliverance" with Jonathan Elias, Richard Bona, and Yungchen Lhamo on Elias' album Path to Zero: A Prayer Cycle (1999)
  • "Easy as Life" with Tina Turner on Elton John and Tim Rice's album Aida (1999)
  • "Sou" with Les Go on their album Dan Gna (2000)
  • "Dara" with Daniela Mercury on her album Sol da Liberade (2000)
  • "Jamaica Farewell" with Dan Zanes on his album House Party (2003)
  • "Safiatou" with Santana and Herbie Hancock on Hancock's album Possibilities (2005)
  • "Voodoo Child" with the String Cheese Incident on their live album On the Road: Denver, Colorado—March 22, 2002 (2008)
  • "Pearls" with Josh Groban on his album Awake Live (2008)
  • "Zanzibar" with Taj Mahal and Toumani Diabaté on Mahal's album Maestro (2008)
  • "Assante Sana" with Philippe Saisse on his album At World's Edge (2009)
  • "La Vie en rose" with the Preservation Hall Jazz Band on the album Preservation: An Album to Benefit Preservation Hall & the Preservation Hall Music Outreach Program (2010)
  • "All the Seeds" and "Oya" with Lizz Wright on her album Fellowship (2010)
  • "Afirika" with Christian McBride on a 2009 single and on his album Conversations with Christian (2011)
  • "Nzinga Mbandi" with Mariana Ramos on her album Suavidança (2011)
  • "Nakupenda Africa" with Vusi Mahlasela on his album Say Africa (2011)
  • "Gbeti Madjro" with Orchestre Poly-rythmo on their album Cotonou Club (2011)
  • "Aquele Abraço" with Forró in the Dark and Brazilian Girls on Red Hot + Rio 2 (2011)
  • the single "People Power" with Talib Kweli, Zap Mama, Jabulani Tsambo, Zolani Mahola and Ahmed Soultan (2011)
  • "Lady" with ?uestlove, Akua Naru, and tUnE-yArDs on Red Hot + Fela (2013)


Thanks to JoAnn Whetsell for work on this entry.

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